First day config problems

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
16 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

First day config problems

LostJohn
WIKIsdr is working well and wsprdaemon is starting with out  listing errors, but there are no sessions showing on the WIKIsdr. Both are on the same network and switch and each static address show on the router. I cannot ping the sdr from the 3b + pi. I think the source of my problem is the permissions of the pi /etc/dhcpcd file. When I richt click on the network up/down arows on the Task bar tocheck the IP assignments I get the error message "Error saving /etc/dhcpcd.conf file not writeable".
Looking at this file I see Owner netdev. Most files in /etc/ are owned by root. Current permissions are -rw-rw-r-- most of the files owned by root show drwxr-xr-x.  I have zero experence with changing owner or permissions with line commands. I did edit this conf file to set Static address, router, DNS settings.
I could use some help setting permissions and owner correct.
JC
TI4JWC
Rob
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: First day config problems

Rob
Goodness.  Almost nothing, including WD, is going to run if your Pi's networking is not set up.
In any case, I wouldn't expect your Pi to be your DHCP server, so I wouldn't make changes to dhcpd.conf.
Doesn't your router act as your DHCP server?

A normal Raspian network setup defaults to a dhcp client, and if you connect the Pi to your router with an ethernet cable you can even avoid configuring the Wifi.   And it is best for the Kiwis and the Pi to be connected with ethernet cables to a switch or router.

Since all the /etc/files are normally managed by the OS, it seems like it would be simplest for you to re-install Raspbian on your Pi.

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: First day config problems

LostJohn

No No. I am not using the Pi for DHCP. I am setting a static address. On the Pi you do this in the dhcpcd.conf file by using the static commands.

John


On 7/7/2020 7:35 PM, Rob [via wsprdaemon] wrote:
Goodness.  Almost nothing, including WD, is going to run if your Pi's networking is not set up.
In any case, I wouldn't expect your Pi to be your DHCP server, so I wouldn't make changes to dhcpd.conf.
Doesn't your router act as your DHCP server?

A normal Raspian network setup defaults to a dhcp client, and if you connect the Pi to your router with an ethernet cable you can even avoid configuring the Wifi.   And it is best for the Kiwis and the Pi to be connected with ethernet cables to a switch or router.

Since all the /etc/files are normally managed by the OS, it seems like it would be simplest for you to re-install Raspbian on your Pi.




If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
http://wsprdaemon.224604.n8.nabble.com/First-day-config-problems-tp110p111.html
To unsubscribe from First day config problems, click here.
NAML
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: First day config problems

LostJohn
In reply to this post by Rob

I am thinking I will start over by re-flashing the OS.

Other question: In the instructions the wsprdaemon id needs to be a member of the sudo group but also it says that 'auto sudo' is also required. I have not found the command to set 'auto sudo'.

It seams to me that 'auto sudo' would be the same as root?


On 7/7/2020 7:35 PM, Rob [via wsprdaemon] wrote:
Goodness.  Almost nothing, including WD, is going to run if your Pi's networking is not set up.
In any case, I wouldn't expect your Pi to be your DHCP server, so I wouldn't make changes to dhcpd.conf.
Doesn't your router act as your DHCP server?

A normal Raspian network setup defaults to a dhcp client, and if you connect the Pi to your router with an ethernet cable you can even avoid configuring the Wifi.   And it is best for the Kiwis and the Pi to be connected with ethernet cables to a switch or router.

Since all the /etc/files are normally managed by the OS, it seems like it would be simplest for you to re-install Raspbian on your Pi.




If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
http://wsprdaemon.224604.n8.nabble.com/First-day-config-problems-tp110p111.html
To unsubscribe from First day config problems, click here.
NAML
Rob
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: First day config problems

Rob
Do not install wsprdaemon as user 'root'.  Newer versions of WD will not run as user 'root'
Raspbian sets up user 'pi' with auto-sudo permissions.
So it is easiest to install WD as user 'pi', since all OS configuration changes are automatically made by WD during installation.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: First day config problems

LostJohn
OK. I found cause of my first problem where I could not Ping KIWIsdr from pi. I have a bad gigabit switch. It can pass data on but nothing port-to-port in the switch. $10 --- got what I payed for!

New OS and I built the wsprdaemon userid and added it to the sudo group.
 first GITHUB went well but when running ./wsprdamon.sh -V I get the error that it cannot find kiwirecorder.py. I went to github url provided but I could not find a 'copy' or Download function. I assume that I can just drop the source py file into the wsordaemon directory?
How do I DL the file?
Looking fordware to a good finish after all the learning.
John
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: First day config problems

LostJohn
In reply to this post by Rob
In the morning I will build the OS again. This time I will stay with the Pi user ID as you recommend. I am hoping that my missing file will appear.

John
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: First day config problems

LostJohn
TA-DA!  

Up and running TI4JWC.

 Now to learn about the noise reports and graphics.
Thanks for very fine software.
John
Rob
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: First day config problems

Rob
Hi John,
It is great to have a WD site in Central America.  
However I see very few spots per hour from you on http://wsprd.vk7jj.com/
Top spotter sites like KD2OM and OE9GHV record 1000+ spots per hour, and I would expect you to be able to get that many as well.
What antenna system are you using?
Rob
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: First day config problems

LostJohn

Hi Rob.


I am using Hy Gain AV 680 vertical.  Up 3 m but only 3m  to a concrete wall with electric fence on my North side.

I have only yesterday ordered aluminum boxes for my KIWISDR and Pi and still need to move coax to not cross Ethernet lines. I hope to cut the noise level some.

I am on the South slopes of the Barva volcano  and the Poas volcano to my West.

I do have a Hex beam on tilt-over, crank-up, but this is the wet time of the year and the storms are daily and of course it is directional.

Next life I will retire to an antenna farm in a salt marsh.

Learned how to display spots  { -d } today from the forum. I am trying to get the postgreSQL database spots and noise reports.

I do see the noise graphs via browser to my Pi.

Might I see any improvement or is it not worth the effort to optimize the RF gain for each band/time?

I will be working on adding back the by-the-hour band activation. I hope to gain an open slot for my direct use. I do have a second KIWI but I am

not ready with a wide band amp and split-er.

John

73


On 7/11/2020 9:43 AM, Rob [via wsprdaemon] wrote:

Hi John,
It is great to have a WD site in Central America.  
However I see very few spots per hour from you on http://wsprd.vk7jj.com/
Top spotter sites like KD2OM and OE9GHV record 1000+ spots per hour, and I would expect you to be able to get that many as well.
What antenna system are you using?
Rob


If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
http://wsprdaemon.224604.n8.nabble.com/First-day-config-problems-tp110p124.html
To unsubscribe from First day config problems, click here.
NAML
Rob
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: First day config problems

Rob
It sounds like you have a challenging QTH.
Unplug your coax from your vertical, short the coax and look at 0-30 Mhz on your Kiwi.
If you see noise, it is being picked up in your coax and the cables feeding the Kiwi.
Try powering the Kiwi from a battery.  The Kiwi is very immune to the differential SWPSU noise, but when LAN and coax are connected PSU and other noise sources will appear as a differential signal on the Kiwi's SMA RF input.

I attached a wifi client adapter to the LAN port, battery power the  Kiwi and take it out to the antenna feed point.  Only then do you truly know if the noise is coming from the antenna.

Also unbalanced antennas are inherently sensitive to local noise.  WD users in urban and suburban environments have done quite well with vertical dipole active antennas.

In a low RF noise QTH/system  the Kiwi's internal noise is greater than that supplied by antenna at 10-30 MHz, so Kiwi's benefit from 10+ dB of gain at those frequencies.  In general, add as much *clean* gain as possible before the Kiwi, but you will almost certainly need an AM band blocking filter as well.

I can email you an invitation to our weekly WD users group zoom meeting which is held at 16:00Z on Wednesdays where you will find hams much more expert than I on those subjects

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: First day config problems

LostJohn

Thank you Rob. Yes I would like to learn from the others on the zoom meeting. Never done zoom yet.

John


On 7/11/2020 5:49 PM, Rob [via wsprdaemon] wrote:
It sounds like you have a challenging QTH.
Unplug your coax from your vertical, short the coax and look at 0-30 Mhz on your Kiwi.
If you see noise, it is being picked up in your coax and the cables feeding the Kiwi.
Try powering the Kiwi from a battery.  The Kiwi is very immune to the differential SWPSU noise, but when LAN and coax are connected PSU and other noise sources will appear as a differential signal on the Kiwi's SMA RF input.

I attached a wifi client adapter to the LAN port, battery power the  Kiwi and take it out to the antenna feed point.  Only then do you truly know if the noise is coming from the antenna.

Also unbalanced antennas are inherently sensitive to local noise.  WD users in urban and suburban environments have done quite well with vertical dipole active antennas.

In a low RF noise QTH/system  the Kiwi's internal noise is greater than that supplied by antenna at 10-30 MHz, so Kiwi's benefit from 10+ dB of gain at those frequencies.  In general, add as much *clean* gain as possible before the Kiwi, but you will almost certainly need an AM band blocking filter as well.

I can email you an invitation to our weekly WD users group zoom meeting which is held at 16:00Z on Wednesdays where you will find hams much more expert than I on those subjects




If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
http://wsprdaemon.224604.n8.nabble.com/First-day-config-problems-tp110p126.html
To unsubscribe from First day config problems, click here.
NAML
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: First day config problems

LostJohn
In reply to this post by Rob

Even with no antenna and a 1/2 inch short on the N connector I reported  KE2UK !

J


On 7/11/2020 5:49 PM, Rob [via wsprdaemon] wrote:
It sounds like you have a challenging QTH.
Unplug your coax from your vertical, short the coax and look at 0-30 Mhz on your Kiwi.
If you see noise, it is being picked up in your coax and the cables feeding the Kiwi.
Try powering the Kiwi from a battery.  The Kiwi is very immune to the differential SWPSU noise, but when LAN and coax are connected PSU and other noise sources will appear as a differential signal on the Kiwi's SMA RF input.

I attached a wifi client adapter to the LAN port, battery power the  Kiwi and take it out to the antenna feed point.  Only then do you truly know if the noise is coming from the antenna.

Also unbalanced antennas are inherently sensitive to local noise.  WD users in urban and suburban environments have done quite well with vertical dipole active antennas.

In a low RF noise QTH/system  the Kiwi's internal noise is greater than that supplied by antenna at 10-30 MHz, so Kiwi's benefit from 10+ dB of gain at those frequencies.  In general, add as much *clean* gain as possible before the Kiwi, but you will almost certainly need an AM band blocking filter as well.

I can email you an invitation to our weekly WD users group zoom meeting which is held at 16:00Z on Wednesdays where you will find hams much more expert than I on those subjects




If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
http://wsprdaemon.224604.n8.nabble.com/First-day-config-problems-tp110p126.html
To unsubscribe from First day config problems, click here.
NAML
Rob
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: First day config problems

Rob
Then much of your feedline and/or shack wiring is acting as an antenna and picking up noise from PSU.
Look at the Kiwi's 3-30 Mhz spectrum display and watch it and the waterfall below it as you disconnect and reconnect the shorted RF coax from the Kiwi's RF input SMA.
Until you see only small differences, you have 'antennas' in the shack and on the way to your outdoor vertical.
Remove the GPS coax and add one cable at a time to the Kiwi.  When you see the 0-30 spectrum degrade you then have to add ferrites and other common mode filtering to that line.
When your shorted coax test is clean, then your Kiwi will be seeing signals only from your vertical.

On Sun, Jul 12, 2020 at 3:37 PM LostJohn [via wsprdaemon] <[hidden email]> wrote:

Even with no antenna and a 1/2 inch short on the N connector I reported  KE2UK !

J


On 7/11/2020 5:49 PM, Rob [via wsprdaemon] wrote:
It sounds like you have a challenging QTH.
Unplug your coax from your vertical, short the coax and look at 0-30 Mhz on your Kiwi.
If you see noise, it is being picked up in your coax and the cables feeding the Kiwi.
Try powering the Kiwi from a battery.  The Kiwi is very immune to the differential SWPSU noise, but when LAN and coax are connected PSU and other noise sources will appear as a differential signal on the Kiwi's SMA RF input.

I attached a wifi client adapter to the LAN port, battery power the  Kiwi and take it out to the antenna feed point.  Only then do you truly know if the noise is coming from the antenna.

Also unbalanced antennas are inherently sensitive to local noise.  WD users in urban and suburban environments have done quite well with vertical dipole active antennas.

In a low RF noise QTH/system  the Kiwi's internal noise is greater than that supplied by antenna at 10-30 MHz, so Kiwi's benefit from 10+ dB of gain at those frequencies.  In general, add as much *clean* gain as possible before the Kiwi, but you will almost certainly need an AM band blocking filter as well.

I can email you an invitation to our weekly WD users group zoom meeting which is held at 16:00Z on Wednesdays where you will find hams much more expert than I on those subjects




If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
http://wsprdaemon.224604.n8.nabble.com/First-day-config-problems-tp110p126.html
To unsubscribe from First day config problems, click here.
NAML



If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
http://wsprdaemon.224604.n8.nabble.com/First-day-config-problems-tp110p128.html
To unsubscribe from First day config problems, click here.
NAML


--
Rob Robinett
AI6VN
mobile: +1 650 218 8896
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: First day config problems

LostJohn

Rob would you please send me the zoom invite. I have misplaced the one you sent previously


John Clark


On 7/12/2020 4:55 PM, Rob [via wsprdaemon] wrote:
Then much of your feedline and/or shack wiring is acting as an antenna and picking up noise from PSU.
Look at the Kiwi's 3-30 Mhz spectrum display and watch it and the waterfall below it as you disconnect and reconnect the shorted RF coax from the Kiwi's RF input SMA.
Until you see only small differences, you have 'antennas' in the shack and on the way to your outdoor vertical.
Remove the GPS coax and add one cable at a time to the Kiwi.  When you see the 0-30 spectrum degrade you then have to add ferrites and other common mode filtering to that line.
When your shorted coax test is clean, then your Kiwi will be seeing signals only from your vertical.

On Sun, Jul 12, 2020 at 3:37 PM LostJohn [via wsprdaemon] <[hidden email]> wrote:

Even with no antenna and a 1/2 inch short on the N connector I reported  KE2UK !

J


On 7/11/2020 5:49 PM, Rob [via wsprdaemon] wrote:
It sounds like you have a challenging QTH.
Unplug your coax from your vertical, short the coax and look at 0-30 Mhz on your Kiwi.
If you see noise, it is being picked up in your coax and the cables feeding the Kiwi.
Try powering the Kiwi from a battery.  The Kiwi is very immune to the differential SWPSU noise, but when LAN and coax are connected PSU and other noise sources will appear as a differential signal on the Kiwi's SMA RF input.

I attached a wifi client adapter to the LAN port, battery power the  Kiwi and take it out to the antenna feed point.  Only then do you truly know if the noise is coming from the antenna.

Also unbalanced antennas are inherently sensitive to local noise.  WD users in urban and suburban environments have done quite well with vertical dipole active antennas.

In a low RF noise QTH/system  the Kiwi's internal noise is greater than that supplied by antenna at 10-30 MHz, so Kiwi's benefit from 10+ dB of gain at those frequencies.  In general, add as much *clean* gain as possible before the Kiwi, but you will almost certainly need an AM band blocking filter as well.

I can email you an invitation to our weekly WD users group zoom meeting which is held at 16:00Z on Wednesdays where you will find hams much more expert than I on those subjects




If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
http://wsprdaemon.224604.n8.nabble.com/First-day-config-problems-tp110p126.html
To unsubscribe from First day config problems, click here.
NAML



If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
http://wsprdaemon.224604.n8.nabble.com/First-day-config-problems-tp110p128.html
To unsubscribe from First day config problems, click here.
NAML


--
Rob Robinett
AI6VN
mobile: +1 650 218 8896



If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
http://wsprdaemon.224604.n8.nabble.com/First-day-config-problems-tp110p129.html
To unsubscribe from First day config problems, click here.
NAML
Rob
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: First day config problems

Rob

On Wed, Jul 15, 2020 at 8:42 AM LostJohn [via wsprdaemon] <[hidden email]> wrote:

Rob would you please send me the zoom invite. I have misplaced the one you sent previously


John Clark


On 7/12/2020 4:55 PM, Rob [via wsprdaemon] wrote:
Then much of your feedline and/or shack wiring is acting as an antenna and picking up noise from PSU.
Look at the Kiwi's 3-30 Mhz spectrum display and watch it and the waterfall below it as you disconnect and reconnect the shorted RF coax from the Kiwi's RF input SMA.
Until you see only small differences, you have 'antennas' in the shack and on the way to your outdoor vertical.
Remove the GPS coax and add one cable at a time to the Kiwi.  When you see the 0-30 spectrum degrade you then have to add ferrites and other common mode filtering to that line.
When your shorted coax test is clean, then your Kiwi will be seeing signals only from your vertical.

On Sun, Jul 12, 2020 at 3:37 PM LostJohn [via wsprdaemon] <[hidden email]> wrote:

Even with no antenna and a 1/2 inch short on the N connector I reported  KE2UK !

J


On 7/11/2020 5:49 PM, Rob [via wsprdaemon] wrote:
It sounds like you have a challenging QTH.
Unplug your coax from your vertical, short the coax and look at 0-30 Mhz on your Kiwi.
If you see noise, it is being picked up in your coax and the cables feeding the Kiwi.
Try powering the Kiwi from a battery.  The Kiwi is very immune to the differential SWPSU noise, but when LAN and coax are connected PSU and other noise sources will appear as a differential signal on the Kiwi's SMA RF input.

I attached a wifi client adapter to the LAN port, battery power the  Kiwi and take it out to the antenna feed point.  Only then do you truly know if the noise is coming from the antenna.

Also unbalanced antennas are inherently sensitive to local noise.  WD users in urban and suburban environments have done quite well with vertical dipole active antennas.

In a low RF noise QTH/system  the Kiwi's internal noise is greater than that supplied by antenna at 10-30 MHz, so Kiwi's benefit from 10+ dB of gain at those frequencies.  In general, add as much *clean* gain as possible before the Kiwi, but you will almost certainly need an AM band blocking filter as well.

I can email you an invitation to our weekly WD users group zoom meeting which is held at 16:00Z on Wednesdays where you will find hams much more expert than I on those subjects




If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
http://wsprdaemon.224604.n8.nabble.com/First-day-config-problems-tp110p126.html
To unsubscribe from First day config problems, click here.
NAML



If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
http://wsprdaemon.224604.n8.nabble.com/First-day-config-problems-tp110p128.html
To unsubscribe from First day config problems, click here.
NAML


--
Rob Robinett
AI6VN
mobile: +1 650 218 8896



If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
http://wsprdaemon.224604.n8.nabble.com/First-day-config-problems-tp110p129.html
To unsubscribe from First day config problems, click here.
NAML



If you reply to this email, your message will be added to the discussion below:
http://wsprdaemon.224604.n8.nabble.com/First-day-config-problems-tp110p130.html
To unsubscribe from First day config problems, click here.
NAML


--
Rob Robinett
AI6VN
mobile: +1 650 218 8896